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Black Panther Is a Beautiful Showcase for Natural Hair  
The Hair Critics Have Already Ruled That Everyone Looks Fantastic in The Black Panther  
the hair critics have already ruled that everyone looks fantastic  
   
       
 
   
Ahead of the movie’s premiere, the Cut talked to the head of Black Panther’s hair department, Camille Friend. The movie’s hair wizard explained the month-long process of creating Angela Bassett’s wig, why Michael B. Jordan needed to wear extensions, and what it was like working on a film that celebrated natural black hair.
 
What was the overall creative direction for the hair in Black Panther?
There were three parts. For the “traditional” look, we used inspiration from the Zulu tribe, the Maasai tribe, and the Hima tribe. Then we looked at the modern styles in the natural-hair movement. Finally we looked at the Afropunk movement, which has a lot of natural and creative styling. Also, there are five tribes in the story, and we had to create different looks for each tribe.
 
working on a movie where everyone was styled in natural hair?
There’s no press and comb in this movie. No relaxers, no nothing! That was one of the things that I really was firm about. I requested that people come with their natural hair. People were like, “Are you sure?” and I was like, “Yes, I am sure! We have a qualified staff of hair people who are phenomenal and who are well-versed in natural hair.”
 
How did you style Michael B. Jordan’s hair?
He has dreadlocks. We wanted to give him a look that you’ve never seen before, and since he is the villain in this story, we wanted him to look strong and bold. He grew out his hair because we didn’t know what we wanted to do with his hair, at first. We eventually decided that we wanted to dreadlock it and keep the sides faded and really short. It’s a great look and he’s really sexy. We added extensions to it, but he did start out with a good amount of hair, and that’s why it looks so natural.
What’s the story behind Angela Bassett’s wig?
That was the pièce de résistance wig. It was a wig we created. All of the dreads were handmade, and they were blended with four different colors. Once those were made — there were about 110 pieces of individual dreads — we sent those to the wigmaker [Natascha Ladek], and the wigmaker inserted them in the wig. That whole process took about a month.
 
Lupita’s hair?
She has two looks in the movie. What we coined as the “Wakanda knot” is basically where we took small individual sections of hair and mixed those sections with Paul Mitchell’s Foaming Pomade, and then we twisted her hair down into itself to create that twist knot. The hair stayed really well all day long.
How did it feel being a part of this movie?
I don’t think black hair has ever been seen in a movie like this. It was an honor to do it and to have an open form to design and take hairstyling to the next level. That’s what we accomplished; we had a great crew and we worked really hard.
 
What do you want people to take away after seeing this movie?
That black hair is versatile and it’s beautiful. With the right products, anything can be re-created.
 
Read more at: Black Panther Is a Beautiful Showcase for Natural Hair
 
 
   
Camille Friend, 'Black Panther' Stylist, What Hair Means to the Film'  
Camille Friend, 'Black Panther' Stylist, What Hair Means to the Film'  
'We can all see ourselves'
   
Hairstylist Camille Friend shares her favorite products and exactly how to use them
 
Chadwick Boseman, Lupita Nyong'o and Michael B. Jordan may get top billing in the smash hit "Black Panther," but the film has another star that’s found its way into the spotlight: natural hair.
 
Since its release on Feb. 16, headlines have been touting the movie as a “love letter to natural hair,” and for good reason. The film features exclusively natural styles — many of which were inspired by traditional tribal looks in Africa — and has been praised for its welcome dose of onscreen diversity.
 
For Camille Friend, the film’s lead stylist, the response to the hairstyles was completely unexpected, and what she calls "the cherry, the cake, the whipped cream, the chocolate and the nuts” on top of an already incredible experience.
 
"'Black Panther' hit at the right time. It's the embrace of black hair, it's the embrace of freedom of expression, and I think those are the things people think about when they think about 'Black Panther,'” she told TODAY Style. "And, also, people look at (these hairstyles) and see themselves ... I think we can all see ourselves — no matter if we're black, white, red or purple — and those are the things that tie it all together.”
 
The inspiration behind the onscreen styles was three-fold: drawing from past, present and future to ensure the looks felt timeless. Friend looked at different styles from tribes all over the world — from Africa to India to the Inuits — and melded it with the current Afropunk movement and elements from futuristic films like "Blade Runner" and "2001: A Space Odyssey."
 
Despite the many, many elements that went into bringing the wide-ranging styles to life, Friend promises they’re attainable in real life with the right products and steps. Here, she breaks down how to get some of the movie’s most iconic looks at home, and shares the hero products (pun intended) she kept on-hand during filming.
 
"My philosophy with natural hair, and almost any type of hair, to make it beautiful and shiny you have to have a mixture of cream and oil,” she said. "If you put too much cream, sometimes the hair doesn't absorb it. If you put too much oil, the hair makes it heavy. So I call it the perfect combination or the perfect storm — it's the cream and the oil together, that's where the magic happens.” Her best advice? “Just go and try products and try and see what works.” Camille Friend
 
 
Read more at: Black Panther Is a Beautiful Showcase for Natural Hair
 
 
   
To get T’Challa’s coils  
To get T’Challa’s coils  
For Beautiful Natural Texture
 
"My philosophy with natural hair, and almost any type of hair, to make it beautiful and shiny you have to have a mixture of cream and oil,” she said. "If you put too much cream, sometimes the hair doesn't absorb it. If you put too much oil, the hair makes it heavy. So I call it the perfect combination or the perfect storm — it's the cream and the oil together, that's where the magic happens.” Her best advice? “Just go and try products and try and see what works.” Camille Friend
 
Read more at: Black Panther Is a Beautiful Showcase for Natural Hair
 
   
   
Black Panther - Official Trailer
Marvel Studios' Black Panther - Official Trailer  
Black Panther - Official Trailer  
   
   
"Black Panther" is a love letter to natural hair  
'Black Panther' is a love letter to natural hair  
'Black Panther' stylist on what hair means to the film: 'We can all see ourselves'  
   
Hype is cool, but real substance is even better. The Black Panther movie opened to amazing reviews and fan reactions and let’s not forget the record-breaking box office stats, with the movie making $192 million over the three day weekend. And this isn’t just groundbreaking for the Marvel universe. Black Panther‘s success speaks volumes about the bankability of a mostly Black cast and a Black director. While watching the movie this weekend, I couldn’t help but focus on one thing: The hair. Tons of natural hair.
 
I didn’t just stare in amazement at the intricate costumes or Michael B. Jordan’s upper body; I was also stunned by the representation of natural hair. And like any aspect of a great movie, everything is intentional — from the costuming to the dialogue to the hair. The head of hair department on the Black Panther set, Camille Friend, told The Cut she specifically requested that everyone come to set with natural hair.
 
All of the women, from Princess Shuri to Nakia to the warriors of the Dora Milaje, were rocking natural hair. They weren’t the hippie-dippie sidekick or a comical Afrocentric caricature. These women were fierce, multi-dimensional characters.
 
Fan favorite Princess Shuri (Letitia Wright) is said to be the smartest person in the world and a tech wiz. Besides stealing the movie (her one-liners were perfect!), she also rocked beautiful braids in chic updos.
 
There’s also Nakia (Lupita Nyong’o), a Wakandan spy who usually had her hair in bantu-style knots, or what Friend called “Wakandan knots.”
 
And can we talk about the Dora Milaje? Their signature bald heads are sources of strength and status for the all-female security team that guards T’Challa. The head of the Dora, Okoye (Danai Gurira), is a multi-layered character. She’s not a robotic, speechless warrior who just fights. She’s a friend and protector of the King, loyal to her country and lover to W’Kabi.
 
The only overt reference to hair in the film is during the epic casino fight scene. In order to go undercover, both Nakia and Okoye have to change their hair — this is their form of assimilation. Nakia rocks a beautiful twist out, and since a bald woman stands out too much, Okoye dons a wig that she’s clearly uncomfortable wearing, even referring to it as a “disgrace.” When the trio is discovered by the bad guys, Okoye immediately flings off her wig and uses it as a weapon to distract her attacker.
 
Of the wig-flinging scene, Gurira told USA Today, “It’s almost like a removal of a shackle and breaking free of a certain type of bondage about what it means to fit into a convention.”
 
In addition to being in awe of their bomb characters, I was getting serious style inspo. If I want to braid my hair, maybe I’ll do a fun undercut like Shuri. Or a cute bantu knot style would be perfect for spring. And hey, if I decide to chop my hair off again, I can totally rock a baldie with pride.
 
When The Cut asked what she wants people to take away after seeing Black Panther, hair department head Friend said, “That black hair is versatile and it’s beautiful.” I don’t think Black hair has ever been seen like this in a blockbuster movie — at least not by me.
 
This kind of hair inspo wasn’t there for me a decade ago. Most of the natural hair YouTubers I love now weren’t around yet either, so I was pretty much winging it by myself. When girls and women see the characters in Black Panther, I’m sure they’ll feel that their natural hair options are limitless. You can be fly and natural and not a punchline.
 
Read more at: "Black Panther" is a love letter to natural hair
 
   
   
Michael B. Jordan’s Dreadlocks  
Michael B. Jordan’s Dreadlocks  
How Did You Style Michael B. Jordan’s Hair
   
He has dreadlocks. We wanted to give him a look that you’ve never seen before, and since he is the villain in this story, we wanted him to look strong and bold. He grew out his hair because we didn’t know what we wanted to do with his hair, at first. We eventually decided that we wanted to dreadlock it and keep the sides faded and really short. It’s a great look and he’s really sexy. We added extensions to it, but he did start out with a good amount of hair, and that’s why it looks so natural.
 
Read more at: Michael B. Jordan’s Dreadlocks
 
 
   
Danai’s Forrest-Shaved Head Look  
Danai’s Forrest-Shaved Head Look, Camille Recommends  
Danai’s Forrest-Shaved Head Look, Camille Recommends  
 
1. Start with a shave stick to prepare your head for shaving (try: Parks Shave Stick or Remington Face Saver).
 
2. Cut hair with a clipper (try: Wahl Shaver Shaper).
 
3. Apply an ingrown hair solution to your scalp (try: Tend Skin Solution).
 
 4. Then, wrap your head in a hot towel.
 
5. Finally, apply Mizani Scalp Care Soothing Serum or almond oil to your scalp.
 
Read more at: Danai’s Forrest-Shaved Head Look, Camille Recommends
 
   
   
Daniel Kaluuya on ‘Get Out’ and ‘Black Panther’  
Daniel Kaluuya on ‘Get Out’ and ‘Black Panther’  
Daniel Kaluuya on ‘Get Out’ and ‘Black Panther’  
   
Daniel Kaluuya’s life is about to change and he knows it. An Oscar nominee for his performance in Jordan Peele’s critical and popular success “Get Out,” he also appears in Marvel’s “Black Panther,” releasing Feb. 16
 
“Usually I do a job and like two weeks later it disappears and is replaced with something else, but ‘Get Out’ kept growing and growing and growing and it keeps taking me to rooms I could never get in before,” Kaluuya says. “It’s been a lot just because it’s something new. You’re trying to go, ‘Alright, cool, what does this mean? What do I do?’ And the answer’s always just be yourself. But I try and continue to make it about the work, because that’s the heart of it.”
 
The Oscar nomination (he was also received Screen Actors Guild and Golden Globe recognition) is particularly sweet for such an internal performance. What Kaluuya is doing in “Get Out” is the kind of clenched, observational work that can be both a challenge and a delight for an actor, but Kaluuya has smartly taken his cues from the masters he’s worked with to date.
 
There has been a lot of talk about genre with “Get Out.” The film was nominated in comedy categories at the Golden Globes, which stirred dissent, though Peele himself has noted the impact of comedy on the project since the beginning. For Kaluuya, the fact that it’s not an easily classifiable film just makes it all the more genuine.
 
“I love pieces like ‘Get Out,'” Kaluuya says. “Loads of stuff that I’ve done has always had a hint of comedy. I did this show called ‘Psychoville’ that’s a horror-comedy. Because I just think that’s what life’s like. Life ain’t a drama. And life isn’t just a comedy. Life is sometimes horrifying. Life is science-fiction. There are all elements and faculties that we navigate, so I just expect a script to reflect that. As long as it’s truthful. I think genre-bending is just being honest.”
 
Read more at: Daniel Kaluuya on ‘Get Out’ and ‘Black Panther’
 
   
   
Daniel Kaluuya on His Get Out Oscar Nomination: ''It's the Dream''  
   
At the red carpet premiere of his new film, Black Panther, on Monday night, Get Out's Daniel Kaluuya talked to E!'s Zuri Hall about what it was like to receive a Best Actor Oscar nomination earlier in the month for his career-making role as Chris Washington in the Jordan Peele-directed horror film.
 
The British actor, who has had a lot of buzz about him during the 2018 award season, admitted, "It's crazy. It's a relief...Especially for a film I believe in."
 
Kaluuya added that the film's success feels unreal and he couldn't be more thrilled. "It's like the dream. I am just so happy. I am so happy for everyone. I am happy that Get Out got nominated for [Best] Film. I am happy that Jordan got nominated—Jordan got nominated three times!"
 
The Sicario actor then admitted that after both he and Peele found out that they were nominated for Oscars, the Key and Peele funnyman called him on the phone and cried tears of joy.
 
Kaluuya added that he believed screen scribe deserved all the praise and admiration he was receiving for his hard work.
 
Read more at: Read more at: Daniel Kaluuya on ‘Get Out’ and ‘Black Panther’
 
 
   
Why the Women of Wakanda Rule ‘Black Panther’'  
Why the Women of Wakanda Rule ‘Black Panther’  
Why the Women of Wakanda Rule ‘Black Panther’'  
   
Lupita Nyong’o, who stars as Nakia, says the fictional land of Wakanda encourages female power. “Wakanda offers us a glimpse into the world as it could be — self-determined and developed on their own terms without the interruption of colonialism. [It] has figured out how to make the most of all its citizens,” Nyong’o says. “Women are allowed to realize their full potential and that’s what Ryan [Coogler] wanted to show and he committed to having that number of women around him.”
 
She says the women contribute to answering central questions the film poses such as, “Who am I?” Nyong’o adds that specifically the character of Shuri, played by Letitia Wright, is an important image for young girls to see given her position as a young, tech-savvy woman.
 
Chadwick Boseman, who stars as T’Challa, also praises Wright’s performance and the role of her character. “Letitia lights up the room as soon as she walks in,” he says. “I was there for her audition. I was like, ‘Listen, all these girls are great, but what she has — you can’t teach that.’”
 
“She embodies, I think, [what] a little sister should be in a movie like this,” Boseman continued. “She brings an aspect of T’Challa out that I love being able to show.”
 
He also addresses the other women in the film, highlighting his character’s mother, Ramonda, played by Angela Bassett, Nyong’o’s Nakia, and warrior Okoye played by Danai Gurira.
 
“Okoye allows you to have another dimension of how you operate because she’s so good at what she does that she’s protecting me on another level,” he says. “She’s like another suit.”
 
Bassett says the women’s roles are a reflection of how they are viewed in African nations. “[T’Challa] can’t do it without them,” she says, adding that there can’t be a king without a queen.
 
“That queen is [T’Challa’s] mother, his sister, the all-female guard,” Bassett says. “Behind the scenes, it’s Ryan Coogler with his first [assistant director], his director of photography, his costume designer, his production designer. So, they are kings because of the queens.”
 
Read more at: Why the Women of Wakanda Rule ‘Black Panther’'
 
 
   
Black Panther's Director Ryan Coogler Breaks Down a Fight Scene  
Black Panther's Director Ryan Coogler Breaks Down a Fight Scene  
Ryan Coogler Breaks Down a Fight Scene  
   
   
Angela Bassett’s hair for ‘Black Panther’ took a month to create  
What’s the story behind Angela Bassett’s wig?  
Angela Bassett’s stunning hair for ‘Black Panther’ took a month to create  
   
That was the pièce de résistance wig. It was a wig we created. All of the dreads were handmade, and they were blended with four different colors. Once those were made — there were about 110 pieces of individual dreads — we sent those to the wigmaker [Natascha Ladek], and the wigmaker inserted them in the wig. That whole process took about a month.
 
Read more at: Angela Bassett’s stunning hair for ‘Black Panther’ took a month to create
 
 
   
Why Angela Bassett Broke a Family Rule for Black Panther  
Why Angela Bassett Broke a Family Rule for Black Panther  
Why Angela Bassett Broke a Family Rule for Black Panther  
   
Angela Bassett and her husband, actor Courtney B. Vance, try to keep their 12-year-old twins away from the glare of Hollywood. But the couple made a rare exception for the premiere of Black Panther, the Marvel epic in which Bassett plays the mother of Chadwick Boseman’s heroic Wakandan leader.
 
“We keep them back from premieres and this sort of thing,” Bassett said, speaking by phone last week from the set of her new TV drama, 9-1-1. “We try to keep them doing their own thing, out and away from it all. But [Black Panther] was one that we felt it was imperative that they experienced and witnessed. It’s an iconic film. It’s such positive images . . . They can see themselves in a light as warriors, as heroes, as kings, as queens, and potential panthers. All things positive. I really wanted them to experience something that in the way they carry themselves, how they walk through the day, with their heads held high and their chests poked out, feeling good about who they are.”
 
Bassett said her children, son Slater and daughter Bronwyn, visited the movie’s set as well, where they saw a version of Black Panther’s women warriors in the form of writer-director Ryan Coogler’s crew, which had an unusual number of women in key roles. “Ryan had his own Dora Milaje,” Bassett said. “Rachel Morrison as the cinematographer and Ruth E. Carter as the costume designer and Hannah Beachler as the production designer.”
 
“I saw these kids on the set during the day and to see them running around and helping me with my queen garb,” Bassett said. “The love they were getting from the actors, it was immediate family. They are all aunties and uncles. As we’re waiting on the mountains, with the waterfalls cascading between us and the drummers just drumming, passing the time, the entire mountain would just yell and sway and dance and just groove and gyrate. It was like nothing you’ve ever seen before. It was just like a familiarity and call that went up to the heavens. So it was pretty spectacular. It was just a source of unbearable pride, except that I could bear it. I would bear it a million times over and over.”
 
Read more at: Why Angela Bassett Broke a Family Rule for Black Panther
 
   
   
Chadwick Boseman: 'There's a thirst' for black superheroes  
'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman: 'There's a thirst' for black superheroes  
'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman: 'There's a thirst' for black superheroes  
   
   
Chadwick Boseman and Ryan Coogler on How ‘Black Panther’ Makes History  
Chadwick Boseman and Ryan Coogler on How ‘Black Panther’ Makes History  
Chadwick Boseman and Ryan Coogler on How ‘Black Panther’ Makes History  
   
“Progress comes in ebbs and flows. You’ve got to put your foot on the gas when it comes … or things can go back to where they were.” Ryan Coogler  
   
Chadwick Boseman struggled to catch his breath after he was cast as Black Panther. When he first tried on his spandex suit for 2016’s “Captain America: Civil War,” it felt too restricting. “It was suffocating,” recalls Boseman. “Literally, it closed off every possibility of air getting to you. I was in it, put the mask on. I said, ‘Hey, you got to get me out of this!’” By the time he headlined his own movie, as the first black Marvel superhero with his name on the poster, Boseman was more comfortable in his re-engineered costume. “I think it begins to feel like skin after a while,” says the 41-year-old actor. “But it takes time to get to that place.”
 
“Black Panther,” directed by Ryan Coogler, is a movie that doubles as a movement, or at least a moment that feels groundbreaking in the same way that last year’s runaway hit “Wonder Woman” inspired millions of women. “Panther” marks the first time that a major studio has greenlit a black superhero movie with an African-American director and a primarily black cast, including Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira and Letitia Wright as Shuri, the princess of the fictional African country Wakanda.
 
“Black Panther” chronicles an origin story for a Marvel character who first made his debut in the comic books in 1966. On the big screen, he’s a warrior named T’Challa, who returns home to an Afro-futuristic country to inherit the throne as king. The release of the movie coincides with a crossroads in America. Racial tensions are heightened as a result of a president who continually makes reprehensible remarks about immigrants from nonwhite countries. “Black Panther” also arrives on the heels of #OscarsSoWhite, the two consecutive years (2015 and 2016) that the Motion Picture Academy failed to nominate any actors of color for awards.
 
 
   
Some are paying attention. “Representation matters,” says Alan Horn, chairman of Walt Disney Studios  
   
Some are paying attention. “Representation matters,” says Alan Horn, chairman of Walt Disney Studios, which owns Marvel. “It’s a powerful and important thing for people to know they are seen and to see themselves reflected in our films and the stories we tell.” Horn believes that “Black Panther” is part of a wave of change. “In terms of gender diversity, we’ve done very well,” he says, pointing to his studio’s own roster that includes “Beauty and the Beast,” “Coco” and the upcoming live-action “Mulan.” “When it comes to diversity reflecting color and ethnicity, I’d say yes, you will see more.”
 
Coogler realizes there is an overarching message in his films. “For me, in retrospect, I realized a lot of what I deal with as an artist is with themes of identity,” the director says. “I think it’s something common among African-Americans. For us, we’ve got a strange circumstance in terms of our view of ourselves.” He made a pilgrimage to Africa before he began shooting “Black Panther,” the first time he visited the continent. “I have to go if I’m making this movie,” Coogler says. “I’m not qualified just because I look like this.”
 
Adds Coogler: “I tend to like movies where the filmmaker has a personal connection to the subject matter. I don’t know if you could find a group of films that deal with the Italian-American organized crime better than ‘Godfather 1,’ ‘Godfather 2,’ ‘Mean Streets’ and ‘Goodfellas.’ Show me a movie about Brooklyn better than ‘Do the Right Thing.’”
 
The journey of “Black Panther” to the big screen was a long process. In the early ’90s, Snipes wanted to play the role, even going as far as collaborating on a script and meeting with a series of directors. “We thought it would be something very cool and atypical for a Marvel comic-book character,” Snipes says. “Something that would appeal to white people, black people, Asian people, and have some martial arts in it. It would have been a culturally diverse shithole,” he says with a laugh, taking a jab at Donald Trump. The movie never took off. “At the time, there were no templates for it,” he says.
“Progress comes in ebbs and flows. You’ve got to put your foot on the gas when it comes … or things can go back to where they were.” Ryan Coogler
 
As executives huddled, they thought of only Boseman for the role of Black Panther, based on his prior on-screen transformations. “I think it was 24 hours between saying his name in a creative story meeting and talking to his agent and getting on the phone with him,” says Kevin Feige, the president of Marvel Studios. Although Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth and Chris Pratt all originally had to audition for their Marvel parts, Boseman got his offer on the spot without a reading. He accepted via speakerphone from Zurich, where he was doing press for “Get On Up.”
 
Playing Black Panther meant Boseman had to enter a boot camp to understand the character physically and emotionally. He worked with a dialect coach to perfect a South African accent, and he took a DNA test to learn about his own origins. “One of the key factors was me getting a sense of my background,” he says. He spent as many as five hours a day in the gym, with a regimen that included weights, cardio and martial arts. “You can’t even stop,” says Boseman, who could slip in only two hours on shooting days. He also had to stick to a special diet. “At first, I was eating a lot of meat,” he says. “And then I felt it was too much for the amount of energy we needed to expend every day.” He wasn’t feeling agile. “So my diet became more vegetarian as we went along.”
 
Read more at: Chadwick Boseman and Ryan Coogler on How ‘Black Panther’ Makes History
 
   
   
Chadwick Boseman's Shirtless Rolling Stone Cover Is Jaw Dropping  
Chadwick Boseman's Shirtless Rolling Stone Cover Is Jaw Dropping  
Chadwick Boseman's Shirtless Rolling Stone Cover Is Jaw Dropping  
   
All hail, Chadwick Boseman!
 
After a record-breaking weekend, the Black Panther star displayed his prowess by posting his brand-new cover of Rolling Stone, which left little to the imagination in the tight-pants department.
 
Black Panther roared into theaters on Friday and has quickly become the top-grossing film in history by a black director (Ryan Coogler) and is projected to make roughly $218 million between Friday and Monday, according to Disney. Additionally, global ticket sales for opening weekend are estimated to tally $387 million by Monday, according to comScore.
 
In the action movie, Boseman plays King T'Challa, ruler of the fictional African nation of Wakanda, which just so happens to be the richest and most technologically advanced civilization on Earth. But when he's not ruling over the people of Wakanda, he's putting on his superhero suit and parading around as Black Panther—a do-gooder trying to make this topsy turvy world (and his kingdom) a little bit better.
 
In the mag, the 41-year-old actor said that the film's popularity means big things for the world as the first African superhero movie.
 
"It's a sea-change moment," Boseman said. "I still remember the excitement people had seeing Malcolm X. And this is greater, because it includes other people, too. Everybody comes to see the Marvel movie."
 
The actor even gushed over how impressed he was with the film and its reception.
 
"The money and manpower it takes to create this entire African world—it's a huge production," said Boseman. "But this is not Star Wars —this is a black superhero movie!"
 
Read more at: Chadwick Boseman's Shirtless Rolling Stone Cover Is Jaw Dropping
 
   
   
Chadwick Boseman Surprises Black Panther Fans While They Thank Him  
Chadwick Boseman Surprises Black Panther Fans While They Thank Him  
Chadwick Boseman Surprises Black Panther Fans While They Thank Him  
   
   
Denzel Washington Paid for Chadwick Boseman to Study at Oxford  
Denzel Washington Paid for Chadwick Boseman to Study at Oxford  
Denzel Washington Paid for Chadwick Boseman to Study at Oxford  
   
   
What Would They Eat In "Black Panther"  
What Would They Eat In 'Black Panther'  
Have you ever wondered what type of food they would eat in Wakanda
 
 
iconversations engaging social media
STEM oriented enterprise architecture business and data analysis methodologies to engage industry moguls in Social Media @iConversations while marketing Hair Salons and Barbershops    
 
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Technology Savvy Social Media engaging Business Moguls in
"Real-Time" marketing Hair Salons and Barbershops
 
iconversations
is savvy social media marketing using Enterprise Architecture business and data analysis methodologies to engage industry moguls around the globe from all business sectors to market
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Hair Salons and Barbershops are an integral fabric within American culture and are of major interest to all communities within the country. Black Hair Salons and Black Barbershop uses the following social media venues to market client business profiles.
 
blackhairsalons.TWITTER
blackbarbershop.twitter
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what we do
Black Hair Salons and Black Barbershop in association with iConversations Social Media engages business industries including Hair and Beauty, Entertainment, National News Media, Food and Fitness Industries, Professional Athletes, Celebrity Chefs, Political Representatives, plus more, to market Hair Salons and Barbershops.
 
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iConversations engages social media using customer relationship management best practices, and savvy marketing techniques incorporated with humor and wit to market. During this process Hair Salons and Barbershop business profiles are marketed using Twitter, Instagram, Facebook.
 
 
 
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  • iConversations Clients' business products and services are showcased to a very upscale diverse demographics of quality social media colleagues, thus giving your business high visibility locally, regionally, and around the globe.
  • iConversations has cultivated quality social media relationships engaging upscale diverse collaborative communities and businesses around the globe in "Real-Time".
  • Conversations values family, relationships, and her social media colleagues. We sincerely value people and our relationships with them first.
 
 
 
 
conversations social media
"A lifestyle everyone should have access to."
 
  • iconversations parterned with iSalons is savvy interactive online social media consulting on the "cutting edge" of information technology engaging industry moguls around the globe in "Real-Time" showcasing all business industry sectors.
  •  isalons iconversations engages industry moguls online interactively in conversations within the Entertainment Industry, Hair and Beauty business, National News Media, Professional Athletes through sports media, Celebrity Chefs who engage audiences with mouth watering cuisine.
  • iConversations Clients' business products and services are showcased to a very upscale diverse demographics of quality social media colleagues, thus giving your business high visibility locally, regionally, and around the globe.
  • iConversations has cultivated quality social media relationships engaging upscale diverse collaborative communities and businesses around the globe in "Real-Time".
  • Conversations values family, relationships, and her social media colleagues. We sincerely value people and our relationships with them first.
 
 
 join the conversations engaging industry moguls