Conversations on Twitter  Conversations on Facebook  Instagram  Conversations Conversations Social Media   Denise Pulliam Bio Order Now 202.748.2870            
 
hair salons & barbershops iconversations
Technology Savvy Social Media engaging Industry Moguls in "Real-Time"
 
STEM oriented enterprise architecture business and data analysis methodologies to engage industry moguls in Social Media @iConversations
Skip Navigation Links
 
When GQ met Anthony Joshua and JJ
When GQ met Anthony Joshua and JJ
When GQ met Anthony Joshua and JJ
 
     
 
To date, Anthony Joshua has fought and won 22 professional bouts. He holds four of the world heavyweight titles and next year could claim the fifth, a feat that has never been done before. But first, something else that's never been done before - part of our 30th-anniversary dissection of masculinity - a man photographed with his son for the cover of this magazine. From why he doesn't want his child to ever enter the ring to what it takes to raise a family right, we find out how boxing taught him not just to fight, but how to be a father
 
t takes a family to raise a man,’ reflects Anthony Joshua as we wait for his mother to collect his son.
 
The heavyweight champion of the world has a small problem. We are in the sprawling garden of a large house in Hadley Wood, a leafy suburb of North London, gathered to photograph Joshua and his young son, Joseph Joshua – known as “JJ”. And while young JJ is happy enough to muck about with his toys, or potter about in the garden, or perch on the lavishly broad shoulders of his 6’6” dad, he is not nearly so happy when it is time for his GQ photo call.
 
“Come here, JJ,” commands Joshua – “AJ” to the court that surrounds him – with a serious frown. “Come here! Come here! Come here!”
 
“I’m leaving,” pipes JJ.
 
And even the heavyweight champion of the world can’t argue with a lad who is just coming up to his third birthday.
 
Read more at: When GQ met Anthony Joshua and JJ
 
it takes a family to raise a man
It takes a family to raise a man
It takes a family to raise a man
 
Joshua believes in the nobility of boxing, the healing power of boxing, the essential decency of the only sport that can’t be described as a game. But when I ask him if he would want JJ to box, he doesn’t even have to think about it.
 
“No,” he says. “It’s too hard. It’s a dangerous sport. I want my son to be the best man that he can be, but I don’t want him to be compared to me. You’re not going to be a boxing star without going through heaps of pain. Life is not a highlight reel. A career is not a highlight reel. People see the glamour, the winning. Nobody’s interested in the knocks and bruises, the bad eye, the struggle. My son has the bloodline for it, there’s no doubt about that...”
 
 
JJ first GQ cover star to demand his afternoon nap before he goes to work
The breaking news is that JJ is ready for his photoshoot after having a good nap while being driven around by his grandmother.
breaking news: JJ is ready for his photoshoot after having a good nap
 
Right now the breaking news is that JJ is ready for his photoshoot after having a good nap while being driven around by his grandmother.
 
Anthony Joshua was born in Watford, the child of Nigerian parents
Anthony Joshua was born in Watford, the child of Nigerian parents
Anthony Oluwafemi Olaseni Joshua was born in Watford on 15 October 1989, the child of Nigerian parents
 
Anthony Oluwafemi Olaseni Joshua was born in Watford on 15 October 1989, the child of Nigerian parents, Yeta and Robert Joshua, who divorced when Joshua – known as “Femi” in childhood – was 12. He was partly educated at a boarding school in Nigeria but spent most of his childhood on the Meriden Estate in Garston, part of Watford’s sprawl. He grew up surrounded by his extended family – aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins beyond counting and an uncertain number of siblings.
 
“I have about seven brothers and sisters,” he says, smiling. “So there is a big pool of us. A tightknit family. My dad was supportive in his own way, even if it was on the phone from Nigeria. My dad was quite stubborn. He wasn’t going to rush to come to me. And I get that and I will always respect my dad. Some people think their parents should have done more, but the way I was raised, I will always have respect for my father.”
 
Yet despite the large, loving extended family, young Femi grew up really good at sports, but really bad at staying out of trouble. By the time Joshua was in his late teens, the trouble threatened to ruin his life. At 18 he spent two weeks on remand in Reading Prison for “fighting and other crazy stuff” – with a possible sentence of ten years.
 
“My life could have been completely different,” he says ruefully. “I’m 28 and it’s ten years since my first amateur fight. But I could just be getting out of jail right now.”
 
"we all have that killer instinct, but we dampen it down in life"
I get that from my old man',  Anthony F Joshua chuckles. 'We all have that killer instinct, but we dampen it down in life'
"I get that from my old man,” Joshua chuckles. "We all have that killer instinct, but we dampen it down in life"
 
But fighting for money at this elite level takes something more, he believes. And it is the reason that Joshua enjoys nothing more than watching documentaries about the animal kingdom, studying nature’s grandmasters of the calculated kill. Joshua is a genuinely warm, friendly man but in the ring he has a chip of ice, a mean streak, a vicious instinct that has concluded almost every one of his fights. “When he has them rocking,” said IBF featherweight champion Josh Warrington of Joshua, “he’s savage.”
 
“I get that from my old man,” Joshua chuckles. “We all have that killer instinct, but we dampen it down in life. That’s what we train for – that killer instinct. It’s what I do for a living. I had that instinct before I ever boxed, but now I know how to handle it, control it and when to use it. And that’s why I think maybe JJ won’t be able to box, because when you come from a less violent background, do you have that instinct? JJ has the bloodline but will he be the strongest in the pack? That’s what people will wonder and I would wonder that too and probably wouldn’t want him to do it.”
 
I had that instinct before I ever boxed, but now I know how to handle it
I had that instinct before I ever boxed, but now I know how to handle it, control it and when to use it.
I had that instinct before I ever boxed, but now I know how to handle it, control it and when to use it.
 
“I get that from my old man,” Joshua chuckles. “We all have that killer instinct, but we dampen it down in life. That’s what we train for – that killer instinct. It’s what I do for a living. I had that instinct before I ever boxed, but now I know how to handle it, control it and when to use it. And that’s why I think maybe JJ won’t be able to box, because when you come from a less violent background, do you have that instinct? JJ has the bloodline but will he be the strongest in the pack? That’s what people will wonder and I would wonder that too and probably wouldn’t want him to do it.”
 
 
Anthony Joshua - The Best Me
Anthony Joshua - The Best Me BULK POWDERS
Anthony Joshua - The Best Me.
 
 
Anthony Joshua: Finchley & District Amateur Boxing Club was love at first sight
One of his many cousins, Ben Ileyemi, took him to Finchley & District Amateur Boxing Club when he was 18 and it was love at first sight.
Ben Ileyemi, took him to Finchley & District Amateur Boxing Club when he was 18 and it was love at first sight
 
Instead he was spared with wearing an electronic tag for a year. Then two years later he was pulled over for speeding and the police discovered herbal cannabis in his sports bag. This time he received a community order and did 100 hours’ unpaid work. And a year later he won the gold medal at the London 2012 Olympics.
 
The young Anthony Joshua, a good, big-hearted kid with an absolute genius for getting into scrapes, was given a shot at redemption and he clasped it in both those massive hands. Joshua has three tattoos – on his right arm, the word “wisdom” and a map of Africa with Nigeria outlined, and a British lion on the back of his neck.
 
“I am a patriot,” he says. “I’m proud of this country. I don’t have to fight in New York or Las Vegas. The belts are here! It’s about time we got the respect we deserve. It has been a blessing to be born here. This country has supported me through thick and thin. This country offers opportunity to everyone. I never tried to get into fights in my life.”
 
“We would go out clubbing a lot when we were young. We would go out raving at the Opera House [a club in Tottenham], somewhere like that, and there was always someone... It would sometimes kick off because they wanted to beat the biggest man they saw. Being big can get you into more trouble than it gets you out of.”
 
Boxing saved him. One of his many cousins, Ben Ileyemi, took him to Finchley & District Amateur Boxing Club when he was 18 and it was love at first sight.
 
“As soon as I walked into that gym for the first time I knew I wanted to give myself to boxing,” he says. “Boxing is the sport that rewards hard work, the sport that if you apply yourself, dedicate yourself, train hard, you can become one of the best in the world. I stopped smoking, I stopped late nights, I cut out everything that didn’t help boxing. Does taking out lots of women help boxing? No? Then cut it out. Does going on to this party help boxing? No? Then cut it out. And when I cut out all the negatives, it began to happen.”
 
“Boxing put me in touch with my own mortality”
“Boxing put me in touch with my own mortality”
What has changed by having my son is that now I think about the future
 
Boxing was another family for Joshua. The trainers at Finchley ABC – the late John Oliver, Sean Murphy and Gary Foley – all had lessons to teach and in the young AJ they discovered a natural athlete who was willing to learn, listen and pay any price.
 
“I needed a full-time, full-on work ethic from male figures,” he says. “A mother raising a son alone is hard work. A boy needs a father – and if a father is not around, then he needs father figures. Those trainers at the gym had seen it all.”
 
Most men are changed by fatherhood but Joshua, who was 25 when JJ was born, says it was boxing that made him a different man.
 
“Boxing put me in touch with my own mortality. Some people have a kid and think, ‘I need to sort myself out now.’ But boxing did that for me. That’s the feeling I had when I walked into a boxing gym. Boxing gave me belief in myself. What has changed by having my son is that now I think about the future – the pitfalls of life, what I’ve seen, how to be a better man.”
 
Anthony Joshua received an OBE for services to Sport from The Prince of Wales
Congratulations to boxer Anthony F Joshua who received an OBE for services to Sport from The Prince of Wales
Congratulations to boxer Anthony F Joshua who received an OBE for services to Sport from The Prince of Wales
 
Anthony F Joshua Unified World Heavyweight Champion
Congratulations to boxer Anthony F Joshua who received an OBE for services to Sport from The Prince of Wales
Anthony Joshua Unified World Heavyweight Champion, holding three of the four major championships in the sport
 
Anthony Joshua believes in the nobility of boxing
Anthony Joshua believes in the nobility of boxing
Anthony Joshua is a warrior and a gentleman
 
Joshua has become our most iconic sportsman since David Beckham because of the way he carries himself inside and outside the ring. He is a warrior and a gentleman. In the toxic, trash-talking world of boxing, now amplified a million times on social media, Joshua insists on treating his opponents with respect before and after the fight.
 
“When you disrespect another fighter, you disrespect the sport,” he says. “You shouldn’t do that to other athletes. He’s shit. He’s this. He’s that. He’s got no credibility. It reflects badly on boxing. Calling people bums... There’s a way to do it. He’s a good fighter – but I’m better!”
 
And even though future opponents over the next few years are likely to be men who all have PhDs in trash talk – Tyson “The Gypsy King” Fury, Deontay “Bronze Bomber” Wilder, Dillian “The Body Snatcher” Whyte – Joshua will never stoop to the trash-talking sewer just to sell a few more tickets on pay-per-view. “It’s always good to be yourself,” he says. “Don’t put on an act. Some of these fighters, they put on an act.”
 
The story of Anthony Joshua is still being written. His career-defining fights – AJ’s “Thrilla In Manila”, his “Rumble In The Jungle” – are waiting in the wings. He holds the IBO, IBF, WBA and WBO titles – everything there is to hold but the WBC belt possessed by Deontay Wilder. Wilder and Tyson Fury fight in LA in December. Like Joshua, they are undefeated. And, as they say in boxing, someone’s “O” has to go. But that is all for another day. Right now the breaking news is that JJ is ready for his photoshoot after having a good nap while being driven around by his grandmother.
 
Read more at: When GQ met Anthony Joshua and JJ
 
Anthony Joshua stops Alexander Povetkin to retain world heavyweight titles
HAnthony Joshua stops Alexander Povetkin to retain world heavyweight titles
Anthony Joshua stops Alexander Povetkin to retain world heavyweight titles
 
Anthony Joshua delivered a stunning finish to stop a game Alexander Povetkin and retain his world heavyweight titles at Wembley Stadium.
 
The IBF, WBO and WBA champion, criticised in some quarters for failing to finalise a deal with the division's other high-profile names, responded emphatically with a seventh-round stoppage of the Russian, who had never been beaten inside the distance.
 
After an early chess match in which Joshua suffered a bloodied nose before cutting his rival, the Briton grew in confidence and a savage right hand followed by a left hook began an onslaught which would prove telling.
 
Another right-left combination downed Povetkin, who somehow made the count, only to stagger into a left hook which saw him slump into the ropes, leaving referee Steve Gray with no option but to intervene.
 
Roars poured down to ringside as the rain had all day, with Joshua's corner ecstatic and rightly so. His display showcased poise, intellect and power, sending a message to the heavyweight division that the champion will take some stopping.
 
Read more at: Anthony Joshua stops Alexander Povetkin to retain world heavyweight titles
 
Anthony Joshua Vs Alexander Povetkin Knockout Full Highlights 2018
Anthony Joshua Vs Alexander Povetkin Knockout Full Highlights 2018
Anthony Joshua vs. Alexander Povetkin
 
It is a few days after Joshua fought Russian Alexander Povetkin in front of 90,000 people at Wembley Stadium, and although he radiates fitness and power like nobody I have ever met in my life, he is a weary man when he sprawls his massive frame across a sofa.
 
“It’s not just the fight. It’s also the training camp,” he says. “You run on adrenaline and eventually your body shuts down. I had really bad flu before the fight – I’ve still got it now – and more than anything my victory was a relief that I got it done. My nose hurts but it’s not broken. And I’m not pissing blood.”
 
Povetkin had been what the boxing world calls “game”. Fighting to redeem himself after years when his career had been tainted by drug bans, the Russian proved a teak-hard challenger, landing a heavy blow flush on Joshua’s nose in the first round and fighting for his life until AJ battered him to the canvas in the seventh.
 
Povetkin felt like a typical Anthony Joshua fight – the faintest hint of vulnerability around Joshua, the edge-of-your-seat drama and then finally the denouement as AJ emphatically cleaned his opponent’s clock. An Anthony Joshua fight is a story in which you are never certain what is going to happen next, but – so far – has always had a happy ending, with Joshua grinning as his corner adorn him in his championship belts and a sold-out British stadium sings his name to the tune of The White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army”.
 
Joshua is a knockout artist – he has fought 22 professional bouts without defeat and won 21 of them by battering the other man to the edge of consciousness or beyond. Fight fans love that stuff. But Joshua is loved way beyond the world of boxing. Wembley Stadium is already booked for his 23rd fight on 13 April 2019, the opponent yet to be confirmed. But whoever he is fighting, AJ can sell out Wembley Stadium like a rock star.
 
Read more at: When GQ met Anthony Joshua and JJ
 
Eddie Hearn
Alastair Campbell interviews Eddie Hearn
Alastair Campbell interviews Eddie Hearn
 
Meet boxing’s ‘Silver-Spoon Kid’. Brought up around the toughest heels in sport and business by a man whose life lessons were given on a canvas, he’s now one of prizefighting’s biggest - read, loudest - promoters.
 
The father’s domain was snooker and darts. But for the son, who took Anthony Joshua from promising amateur to an unbeatable record and record pay-per-views, the billion-dollar deals are being won in the ring.
 
Read more at: Alastair Campbell interviews Eddie Hearn
 
iconversations engaging industry moguls
STEM oriented enterprise architecture business and data analysis methodologies to engage industry moguls in Social Media @iConversations while marketing Hair Salons and Barbershops    
 
who we are
Technology Savvy Social Media engaging Business Moguls in
"Real-Time" marketing Hair Salons and Barbershops
 
iconversations
is savvy social media marketing using Enterprise Architecture business and data analysis methodologies to engage industry moguls around the globe from all business sectors to market
hair salons
barbershops

Hair Salons and Barbershops are an integral fabric within American culture and are of major interest to all communities within the country. Black Hair Salons and Black Barbershop uses the following social media venues to market client business profiles.
 
blackhairsalons.TWITTER
blackbarbershop.twitter
blackhairsalons.instagram
ihairsalons.twitter
salonsaturday.twitter
 
what we do
Black Hair Salons and Black Barbershop in association with iConversations Social Media engages business industries including Hair and Beauty, Entertainment, National News Media, Food and Fitness Industries, Professional Athletes, Celebrity Chefs, Political Representatives, plus more, to market Hair Salons and Barbershops.
 
how we accomplish
iConversations engages social media using customer relationship management best practices, and savvy marketing techniques incorporated with humor and wit to market. During this process Hair Salons and Barbershop business profiles are marketed using Twitter, Instagram, Facebook.
 
 
conversations social media
"A lifestyle everyone should have access to."
 
  • iconversations parterned with iSalons is savvy interactive online social media consulting on the "cutting edge" of information technology engaging industry moguls around the globe in "Real-Time" showcasing all business industry sectors.
  •  isalons iconversations engages industry moguls online interactively in conversations within the Entertainment Industry, Hair and Beauty business, National News Media, Professional Athletes through sports media, Celebrity Chefs who engage audiences with mouth watering cuisine.
  • iConversations Clients' business products and services are showcased to a very upscale diverse demographics of quality social media colleagues, thus giving your business high visibility locally, regionally, and around the globe.
  • iConversations has cultivated quality social media relationships engaging upscale diverse collaborative communities and businesses around the globe in "Real-Time".
  • Conversations values family, relationships, and her social media colleagues. We sincerely value people and our relationships with them first.
 
 
 join the conversations engaging industry moguls